100th Anniversary

Highlights from 100 years of enriching lives and building community

president-Baker

1911

In the Beginning

Committees of high school teachers and CU faculty recommend establishment of an extension department, which was later approved by the Regents and CU President James Baker.

1912-macky

1912

A Place to Call Home

Extension, now the Division of Continuing Education, was formally recognized in 1912 and staff were some the first occupants of the new Macky Auditorium. Burlap bags separated administrative offices from the space shared with the Red Cross.

1912-osborn

1912

Division Director

Loran D. Osborn accepted the position as extension’s first director. He brought a great deal of enthusiasm and managed to persuade many prominent department heads to teach extension courses.

1912

Wait a Minute, Mr. Postman

Twenty-eight correspondence courses in 11 fields were taught that first year, including courses in physics, zoology, sociology, music, engineering, and business. In addition to correspondence study, classes were taught in Cripple Creek, Fort Morgan, Brighton, Glenwood Springs, Grand Junction, Delta, Montrose, Telluride, Boulder, and Pueblo.

1916

Language Skills

Continuing Education began offering foreign nationals what was then called courses in Americanization. Enrollees took part in citizenship and English courses.

1918-Woodbury

1918

Woodbury Hall

Division offices moved to Woodbury Hall.

1921-petersen

1921

New Director

Elmore Petersen was named director. Petersen previously led business classes across the state, often traveling by freight train with only a blanket on the hard floor for a bed.

1921

Home Reading

The Division offered non-credit Home Reading Courses consisting of 27 lists of books in various fields. Each list was considered a course, and successful participants were awarded certificates of completion.

1922-staff-photo

1922

Serving Teachers

The Division organized summer institutes for public teachers in response to a new state law requiring "scholastic and professional training of college grade" to certify teachers.

1923-health-conf

1923

Healthy Effort

Continuing Education sponsored a series of community health conferences in more than 30 towns statewide. CU experts examined children and gave parents and community leaders information to combat health problems.

1924-radio

1924

Radio Broadcasting

The Division delivered ten radio programs featuring CU faculty. Each program included musical numbers, a reading, a resume of university findings, and a short lecture, covering topics such as birth rate, diabetes, and the universe. Letters from “radio fans” were received from listeners nationwide.

1930

Rocky Mountain Writers

The Writers Conference in the Rocky Mountains was founded by the Division and administration was later moved to the Department of English.

1933-work-program

1933

Great Opportunities

In the depths of the Great Depression, Continuing Education organized classes for Civilian Conservation Corps members with instructors essentially donating their time.

1935-alumni-forum

1935

Alumni Forums

Continuing Education established alumni forums, a community lecture series led by esteemed faculty. Each year it gained popularity, with 400 Coloradans participating the first year and 14,000 participants by 1939.

1938-Downtown-Denver

1938

Denver Extension

Complete with classrooms, offices, and a library, Continuing Education opened an extension center in Denver, which would later become the independent CU Denver campus in 1972.

1938-houston-mug

1938

New Director

Clifford Houston named director. In 1942, Houston accepted the governor's appointment as chairman of the Public Information and Education Committee of the Colorado Council of Defense. With support from the Division, the committee sponsored victory rallies in 24 Colorado communities in its first year.

1941-WWII

1941

Help on the Home Front

During World War II, Continuing Education provided direct defense-oriented training and indirect programs for service people and civilians through the Engineering, Science, Management, Defense Training Program and correspondence courses contributing to military proficiency.

1945

Serving Veterans

The end of World War II brought a surge in enrollment due to the GI Bill, and the University Placement Bureau aided 800 CU graduates in the Armed Forces in finding jobs after their discharge.

1946-high-school

1946

High School Outreach

Continuing Education began offering High School Correspondence courses, allowing high school students to take university courses and meet with an appointed teacher.

1947-ac-cross

1947

New Director

Former Bureau of High School Visitation director, Arthur Cross was appointed director. Cross first served as acting director while Clifford Houston served in the Navy.

1951-campbell

1951

New Director

Walter Campbell was named director. For the 28 years prior, Campbell was director of the Bureau of Class Instruction, which offered arts and sciences, engineering, nursing, and some graduate courses in seven widely separated cities with a large portion of enrollment centered in Denver.

1951-BE

1951

Evening Education

Boulder Evening courses offered students access to smaller class sizes and credit courses outside of the daytime campus class schedule.

1952-audio-vis

1952

TV’s Golden Age

The Bureau of Audiovisual Instruction was created during television’s golden age. In 1958, it moved into studios in the new stadium building and produced nearly 30 programs for KRMA, Denver’s educational channel.

1953-easton

1953

New Dean

Former bureau director D. Mack Easton named dean. When the university appointed a committee to review the function of extension, Easton said the Division should function for citizens and local governments adding: "The university as a whole should serve the state as a whole."

1954

Inmate Education

The Bureau of State and Community Services offered courses to inmates with little or no formal education. A number of inmates entered incarceration at a third grade level and reached an eighth grade level within nine months.

1953-1165-Broadway

1955

1165 Broadway

Offices moved to 1165 Broadway.

L47

1955

Colorado Springs Extension

The state approved the establishment of a continuing education center in Colorado Springs, which would later establish an independent campus in 1972.

1956

Real Estate Appraisal Program

The Division offered statewide professional development for the realtors, brokers, and appraisers for nearly 50 years.

1959-great-decisions

1959

Great Minds Think Alike

Continuing Education coordinated all non-credit conferences and institutes on campus. Beginning in 1959, the Division coordinated “Great Decisions,” a foreign policy discussion program that was the most successful in the nation with 15,000 participants.

1963

Western Outreach

The Bureau of Class Instruction opened an office in Grand Junction and began offering classes in 1965. By 1971, in cooperation with Mesa College, the Bureau began offering graduate-level courses.

1968-Bristow

1968

New Dean

After serving as assistant dean for the Division, Avon Bristow was named acting dean.

1969-academy-building

1969

Academy Building

Offices moved to the Academy Building, the former Mount St. Gertrude Academy.

1970

Name Change

The Division officially changed its name from Extension to Continuing Education.

1970-Lymberopolos

1970

New Dean

P. John Lymberopoulos was named dean of Continuing Education. Lymberopoulos joined the CU-Boulder faculty in 1964 as a professor of statistics and international business in the Leeds School of Business.

1970-mini-college

1970

Working Women

As more and more women entered the workforce, the Division created the Mini College for Women, which encouraged women to continue their self-exploration by enrolling in a four-year institution or exploring employment opportunities.

1975-SAVE

1975

Save a Spot

Continuing Education offered Space Available Voluntary Education (SAVE) to permit enrollment of non-degree students after campus reached enrollment caps. The program later became Available Credit Courses for Eligible Special Students (ACCESS).

1975

Language Lessons

Continuing Education established the International English Center and began offering English courses in the fall of 1975.

1979-music

1979

Music Lessons

Applied Music was created to provide private and group music lessons to students for CU credit in the 1970s.

1980-academy-newspaper

1980

Up in Flames

An arson-caused fire destroyed in the Academy Building where the Division was housed. The disaster forced the administrative offices to temporarily relocate to the three cottages near the Office of the President that had been destined for deconstruction. The arson was never solved.

1981-1221-1229-university

1981

University Avenue Offices

Offices move to 1221 and 1229 University Avenue.

1982-Berg

1982

New Director

Former music teacher and director of the Bureau for Class Instruction Clay N. Berg was named executive director.

science-discovery-rocket1

1983

Ready for Liftoff

Science Discovery was established as an experience-based, educational science outreach program. Administration of the program moved to Continuing Education in 2010.

1983-tech-center

1983

Tech Center

The Audiovisual College Education (ACE) program was expanded to form the Center for Advanced Training in Engineering and Computer Science. The program is now the Center for Advanced Engineering and Technology Education (CAETE), which fills distance-learning needs from engineering firms.

1986-Connecting-colorado

1986

Connecting with Colorado

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Bruce Ekstrand established a grant program for faculty to deliver statewide outreach programs to Colorado citizens. A faculty committee coordinated by the Office for University Outreach now administers the fund.

1992

High School Concurrent

Continuing Education began administering the High School Concurrent program to serve students interested in the challenge of completing college courses for high school and/or college credit.

1995

World Wide Web

Continuing Education offered its first online course. Many departments, schools, and colleges now offer online courses through Independent Learning, CAETE, and Summer Session.

1996-Heinz

1996

New Dean

Anne K. Heinz was named dean of Continuing Education and associate vice chancellor of Summer Session.

1996-summer

1996

Summer School

Although Summer Session had been offered since 1904, an academic affairs strategic committee recommended it be enhanced and its administration moved to Continuing Education.

1998-university-building

1998

University Avenue Building

The Division moved into former Delta Tau Delta fraternity house at 1505 University Ave. The white, brick building remains home to the Division's administrative offices.

2000

Maymester

Maymester was founded to provide a three-week intensive session that allows students to earn credits in May as one of Summer Session's five terms.

2002-FIRST

2002

Visiting Professors

Faculty In Residence Summer Term (FIRST) was established to bring world-class faculty to Boulder during Summer Session to teach and foster partnerships with the host academic departments.

2009-CU-complete

2009

Returning Students

CU Complete was established to help former CU students return to college to earn their bachelors degrees. Many students had not completed their degrees despite being in good academic standing and at least halfway done with requirements.

2009-outreach

2009

Outreach Appointment

The Office for University Outreach was established and Dean Anne K. Heinz was appointed Associate Vice Chancellor for Outreach and Engagement.

2009-LMAC

2009

Colorado's Climate

The LearnMoreAboutClimate. colorado.edu website and outreach initiative was created to extend the university’s climate science education and research.

2010-outreach-web

2010

Outreach & Engagement Website

The Outreach and Engagement website, at outreach. colorado.edu, was created as the comprehensive, campus-wide source for outreach program information and resources.

Continuing_Ed_Group_FINAL

2012

100th Anniversary

CU Continuing Education celebrates 100 years of enriching lives and building community.